The Revolution Is Here – Take It To Heart

In every revolution, the “intelligentsia,”are swept aside.  They represent an entrenched notion of superiority and upper class that would keep change within their purview for ever. They call anyone who is not aligned with them “ignorant.”

But Americans have developed a different model of “knowing” called “trending.”

Ignorance is what?  What does a person have to “know” to rise above ignorance? Over the past six decades, we Americans have gradually diluted and “re-purposed”public education to reveal a new role for our schools:  Day Care and fail-proof graduation.

BTW:  What we don’t know, we can, like, Google, right?  Like, the internet is a great source, right?  And, like, almost better than rumors.  And Twitter, hey.  Right?  It is not only right; it is right now!  Who needs to be smart when they have smart PHONES;)

Each generation allowed to drift away from personal responsibility and thoughtful challenge dims our future, and insults our past.  Then the child become the parent, their children become parents, ad nauseum.  There is a saying, “Wisdom comes with age.”  But apparently, sometimes, age comes alone.

What has come of the devaluation of deep education, and elimination of critical thinking/learning skills?  Is it fair to castigate an electorate that has been hoodwinked into accepting whatever their equally educated associates and self-proclaimed leaders tell them?

What do we expect from uber-indulged offspring, un-chaffed by the requirements of self-reliance?  Why should we be surprised when 4th generation union laborers cry out in pain when their family traditions leave them without a clue or a paycheck?

We find ourselves in 2016, after wrenching damage to our smug image of ourselves as Americans with unlimited potential, who need only show up to garner success.  The wounds inflicted by 9/11 are still with us after 15 years of missteps in response.  We have tried to deny the damage; we have launched counterattacks on the phantoms of suicide using oceans of borrowed money to fund distant wars with professional warriors; we have salved our pain with money borrowed to buy homes and the trappings of wealth against a mirage of future prosperity; we drowned in the aftermath of deluded excess; we barely made our way back to the shores of reason and a semblance of recovery.

Now, we use deceitful yardsticks to measure our return to Camelot.  Empty words like “employment” when a person finally finds a job at 60% of their former pay.

We make false implications like “college education” when a barely literate and numerate high school “graduate” borrows the price of a new home to learn to read, write, and use a computer; then, the search for work that will pay the student loans, while the “college graduate,” either stays in the family basement, or shares desperate apartment space with like-indentured contemporaries.

When I say “we,” I mean our shackled culture.  We have been fooled into believing what we are told, minding our “political correctness,” and allowing mobs to control our justice system when, the results do not satisfy them.  We have allowed loud minorities of no more than 3-5% of our population to direct our legislatures and judiciaries to give them control and sanctions over the rest of our society.  We have succumbed to the notion that Americans have to allow others to flaunt our laws, treaties, and alliances because we should never stand firm, confront evil, or fight dirty.

The idealized America of the past was pretty hard-nosed, and seldom a patsy for, “that’s not NICE.”  Our heroes were tough guys who would not stand for threats or false promises.  Somehow we believe we are still tough when we are just the opposite.

The social organizers, the media and professional politicians have informally colluded to keep Americans in their recliners, consumers of what they conjure, passive observers of life in America.

But we all have our limits, and when those limits are breached, we get up and fight the bullies who have tried to keep us under control with their well-honed rules.  Both Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders are appealing to the Americans who have suffered and who see not relief, but more suffering.  They are mad as hell, and they are not going to take it anymore.

Even if these gladiators are martyred by “the System,” they have awakened those who have let things go too long.  These revolutionaries will not accept sophisticated “ideas” or convoluted promises; they want palpable relief.  They want to push the buttons, and pull the levers, and see results that make a difference.

The Least of Evils – How Did We Get Here?

I believe in watching, reading, and listening to people with whom I differ, even people who label me through prejudice, ignorance, or laziness.  It helps me understand their thinking, and I can learn a great deal from them.  I do not have to agree with alternate world views, religious beliefs, xenophobia, or virulent attacks on who we are as Americans, to gain from the thoughts of others.

Just based on the title, I could not resist reading an intriguing, recent article from Al Jazeera.  (“Muslims for Bernie Sanders” Hamid Dabashi – Al Jazeera – April 18, 2016)

Hamid Dabashi, is a Muslim New Yorker, and is Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York.  He makes clear that he sees America as:

“an imperial republic that systematically arms the rich tyrants around the world, supports Israel stealing Palestine and murdering Palestinians one settlement at a time, and helps to create monstrosities such as ISIL,”

Nonetheless, he struck a chord with me with his depictions of the candidates for President.

He sees a Jew, Bernie Sanders, as the least of evils.  Here is how he described the other candidates:

On the Republican front, Ted Cruz and Donald Trump are clean-shaven prehistoric cave-dwellers in business suits, while Hillary Clinton on the Democratic front is the dictionary definition of a chameleon – like a corrupt politician changing colour depending on which way the political wind blows but consistently representing mega-donors, big banks, and Super PACs without any moral scruples, while feigning that she cares about the poor and the disenfranchised.”

Prejudiced?  Clearly.  Exaggerated?  Yes.  Unkind?  You bet.  A tinge of truth?  I think so.  This is an example of unfettered expression that peels away “positions,” facades, proclamations, and euphemisms; it paints hyperbolic, clown makeup on politicians willing to do anything to take control of the world’s most powerful office.

Of course, I do not know any of the candidates intimately; that leaves me in the same boat with 320-million fellow Americans.  We are stuck with what we see, hear, and read from the media, and the doctrinaire: fine-tuned, over-financed, underhanded, cruel, amplified bullshit.  What we notice is demagoguery, ad hominem attacks, critical weaknesses, as well as financial and moral contamination.  Is this the best we can expect?

Truth is, we created this cultural environment, so toxic, superficial, and righteous, that stellar citizens shun the thought of public office.  That leaves people who are some combination of ambitious, connected, famous, infamous, genuine, ingenuous, humorous, inspiring, fearless, facile, naive, opinionated, savvy, confident, telegenic, persuasive, eloquent, ruthless, righteous, charismatic, narcissistic, attractive, energetic, etc.

Later this year, each party will choose a candidate.  Will they be the clear delegate winner, winner of brokered convention, or a “dark horse,” knighted by their party?  Then they will choose the appendage candidate for vice president.  They become “the Ticket.”

Then we will have the November election.  Who will win?  I think the populist candidate who mobilizes angry constituents in pain.  We should not be surprised, given the ignition of the underemployed, the unpredictable “millennials,” and those wounded by the economy on either end of the political spectrum. If they show up at the polls, Sanders/Trump could be chosen.

Otherwise, if the Republicans do not unite, Clinton/Sanders wins.  The impact of a new justice on the Supreme Court will be momentous.  The real focus should be on electing legislators.  We have capable, reasonable candidates for most open seats.  I do not believe the presidential election will influence the congressional elections much.  The composition of the Senate and the House of Representatives is most critical in setting the stage for the next 4-8 years.  Choose well.

(I have great concerns for the nation should “entitlements” expand and laws against “inequality” prevail.  The power of prayer is becoming more attractive every day.)

 

 

Nightmare on Underwhelm Street

 

Medical Insurance, Healthcare Marketplace, and Eternity on Hold Under Obamacare

Wouldn’t it be great to have unlimited hours and days to manage your family’s medical insurance?  Apparently, that is what is required under the new medical insurance regime.

Straight story:  My wife is a home health care nurse.  Her employer is a giant in the home health care business.  In addition to her paycheck, she had good health care insurance paid mostly by the company.

With the advent of the A.C.A aka Obamacare, employers were let off the hook for 2014 regarding penalties for not providing medical insurance.  At the same time, individuals were required to have it.  The home health giant dropped health insurance benefits, not for office staff or management, but ONLY for the nurses who delivered the care.

That led to the pursuit of an individual policy for my wife paid with after-tax dollars of $605 per month.  To the uninformed, this means having to earn $800 per month, paying $195 dollars in Social Security, Medicare, and income taxes, to net $605 to pay the premiums. (Question:  who got the $195 that she did not have to pay beforehand?)

Then we discover that her doctors are not included on the “in network” list or are not accepting her new coverage.  Several times we drove to the offices of doctors who were listed as providers on the company’s website, and discovered that they either dropped out of the “network,” or closed their doors.

In December she got notice that her premiums were increasing to $710 for 2016 for the math challenged, this is a 17.4% increase.)  Another $140 per month of earnings less $35 in taxes.  So we were facing paying $940 of her pre-tax earnings each month ($11,280 per year) for insurance with $2,000 deductible and $7,000 annual out of pocket.

Fortunately, her new employer offered her better health insurance benefits as of 01/01/2016 at $360 per month for her share.  She now only has to earn 470 dollars per month, and pay $110 in taxes to cover this benefit.

But wait, there is more.  We both tried for nearly two weeks to cancel the old policy.  Nowhere on the health insurer’s website are information or links to cancel a policy.  We called the 800 number for customer service numerous times, only to be subjected to hour plus waits ending in mysterious hang ups.  When I finally reached the customer service number after 1 hour and 40 minutes of waiting, I was informed that I had to call the Marketplace to cancel the policy.

After another wait, I was told I had to give them 14 day’s advance notice to stop the January premium payment.  This would have meant $710 paid for January for double coverage.  When I asked who I could talk to, I was given an 800 number that was answered by the health insurance company.

This is not apocrypha; this is first-hand experience.  Replicate this experience millions of times and you have the cost we are paying for the changes caused by Obamacare, not counting the coming tax filings by employers and employees, the IRS processing and enforcement.

 

Truth Is, Neither Political Party Has Real Solutions – Unsolved Problems Equal Unrivaled Political Power

Have you noticed how much time and blather are lavished on inventing and enlarging problems, blaming, and shaming the “other” for causing, maintaining, expanding and taking advantage of problems?  Have you paid attention to how little or no time is invested in compassionate, cooperative, thoughtful, creative ideas?  Have you noticed how little time is spent pursuing sometimes simple obvious solutions, and strategies to reduce divisiveness, or resolve negative issues?

That is because “Problems = Power” in politics – especially perpetual & perpetuated problems.

What is a problem?  Think about it – a problem is a perception, a belief, a concept, an idea, a puzzle, a construct that proposes that an obstacle, a burden, a threat, or a harmful condition exists for a person or group of people.

The word “problem” also implies that a “solution” or “answer” or “proof” is available.

If you want political power:

  • Define a “problem” and declare a solution is available.
  • Proclaim yourself the champion of a particular social, financial, cultural pain for which you have the answer.
  • Stand up as the leader who will right a present, past, or future wrong.
  • Convince others that you are a spearhead who will break the hold of nefarious conspiracies on the throats of the weak, disadvantaged, and marginalized.

The basic strategy appears to be:

  • Maintain and emphasize the “problem” to your intended constituency.
  • Complain publicly, and produce anecdotal, sometimes rare examples of the “problem,” victims, or damage.
  • Blame someone else for creating, expanding; and perpetuating the “problem.”
  • Berate anyone who could or could have, should or should have solved the “problem.”
  • Propose a law so someone else has to stop it, fix it, or pay for it.
  • Promise that, if elected, you will fight it, expose it, or make it “fair.”
  • Make emotional accusations that others intentionally cause the “problem” for their benefit.
  • Stir up anger and hatred for groups, classes, or nations accused of causing, imposing, or withholding solutions for the “problem.”

But do not, under any circumstances, actually do anything to solve the problem systemically because, when you solve the problem, you lose the power created by the problem.  (that is, if there really is/was /were a problem.)

Some statements sound like problems, but they are really just statements.  For example, I remember hearing:

  • “The poor will always be with us.”
  • “How much better is it to acquire wisdom than gold! and to acquire understanding is worthmore than silver!”
  • “Thethings you own end up owning you.”

Other “problems” are invented and protected, such as the “problem” of requiring a photo ID.

First, has anyone, besides me, ever been in another country?  Everyone, citizens, residents, & visitors must have “papers” such as passports, or else you go to jail or get deported, period.  Often, proof of birth is not on record, but the governments know this and have methods of dealing with it.  Guess what? – people get and keep IDs.

Second, we live in a culture of ubiquitous identity verification requirements.  How does anyone live in the USA without government issued ID?  We need ID’s to receive, record, do, buy, or operate anything worth receiving, recording, doing, buying, or operating.  Here are some examples:

  • Paychecks (job application & check cashing)
  • Social security checks (benefit application & check cashing)
  • Credit purchases
  • Food Stamps (benefit application & purchasing)
  • Unemployment (benefit application & check cashing)
  • Welfare (benefit application & check cashing)
  • Home & auto titles
  • Insurance
  • Marriage
  • Birth
  • Divorce
  • Buying alcohol
  • Driving
  • Attending school
  • Getting medical care
  • Internet purchases
  • Electricity
  • Sports events
  • Buying stupid stuff advertised on TV for $19.95, (but wait – order now &..)
  • And much, much more

Oh, I forgot, with everyone taking “selfies” these days, that means they have a smartphone, and the related bills.  They are also creating photo IDs on the internet.  So who is left?  The Disabled, the Aged, the Homeless, the Poor?

Why haven’t their family, or friends, or social workers, or political party members taken them to the Department of Motor Vehicles, or the Post Office, or wherever they need to go to get an ID?  The fact that the photo will be atrocious should not daunt you.  The ultimate ID is a US passport, good anywhere in the world.  Next is a driver’s license or a non-driver’s ID from the state.

Obviously, the first step is a census, a list of people who do not have an ID.  The opponents of having an ID seem to know who they are; so prove it; produce the list.  Then solve the problem instead of complaining.

Third, where photos are required, couldn’t we just have cameras, or smartphones to take pictures of people who have none (duh)?  For example, have digital cameras to take photos of any who wants to vote, but has no ID.  Email the picture, name, address, and phone number to a secure central server.  If there ever is a problem or doubt, you have the data to answer any questions. I’ll bet the pictures would come out better than the Department of Public Safety, or Department of Motor Vehicles, or, heaven forbid, Department of Corrections.  This data could also be used to create a photo ID, once verified.

Fourth, isn’t getting a photo ID something that lasts once you get one, or only requires renewal every few years?  If you average out the yearly cost of having a photo ID, it should be affordable (maybe $5-10 per year, at most).

I mean, if you knew Aunt Betty did not have a photo ID, couldn’t you help her get one as a 50th birthday present?  Also, if a political party wanted supporters to vote, couldn’t they spend some small fraction of the millions of dollars they raise to get them ID’s?  Naahh!  Just let the problem ride, and keep the power so you can accuse, complain, and litigate again next year.  Oh, and take the “problem” to the Supreme Court to make it permanent.

But, this is just one example.  Let’s think about how politicians develop strategies around problems.  What is missing, or mislaid?

  1. Avoid Problem Analysis – Strategy: generalize, exaggerate, fabricate, and avoid any details and real research.

Ask yourself, would the protestations of ANY of the current candidates for President solve ANY of the serious pains Americans are suffering?  All I have heard are mission statements, results promises, and slogans.  Oh, I forgot, blame, & snide ad hominem bombs hurled like fireworks into the air, never to land; entertaining, reinforcing, & useless.

  1. Avoid Solution Analysis – Strategy: poor math, blur the subject, blame obstacles, avoid saying who would really pay.

Has anyone heard of a workable tax/spend plan that would actually produce the stated result, in practice?  It must be out of fashion to think things through; for example, “Tax the Rich” probably won’t work, when we wiggle the definition of “rich,” and forget that people do not stand still for painful government actions.  They either stop the taxable behavior, or substitute non-taxable behavior, or cheat.  “Do Not Tax the Poor” is a problem when the definition of “poor” is feeble, and government spending exceeds the resources of everyone.

  1. Avoid Distinctions – Strategy: collapse specific meanings into general terms, confuse demographic groups by using the same words to describe different groups.

The most prominent example of this is the intentional, improper use of the word “immigrant.”  “Immigrant” means a person who is a citizen of another country living in the USA legally by registration (aka – Green Card), or through naturalization to become a citizen of the USA.

That is all.   The term is specific and narrow in its legal definition; it absolutely excludes “unregistered aliens,” “foreign nationals,” “migrants” and so called, “illegal immigrants,” and “undocumented workers.”  All of those terms refer to unregistered non-citizens living here in violation or our immigration laws.  But, clever politicians, journalists, and advocates substitute the word “immigrant” for people who are not citizens.

The effect of this is to rile up immigrants, who are Americans, and make it sound like Americans hate immigrants.  Use the right words and it is clear that Americans love immigrants; we ARE immigrants, or descendants of immigrants.  We oppose people violating our immigration laws.

It is deceitful, and “newspeak” to use euphemisms or the word “immigrant” with obfuscating adjectives to imply that illegal aliens are really just citizens who kind of sort of haven’t taken care of a few annoying, paperwork details, so it is okay for them to come here and stay as long as they want because they really are Americans; aren’t they?

All in all, we can be tricked into supporting causes and politicians by perceiving “problems” as reality.  Sure, there are real problems, like homelessness, nuclear threats, infrastructure neglect, terrorism, inadequate public education, business and government corruption, to name a few.

But “inequality,” and “poverty” will always exist because people are different and “unequal” in many ways.

Should we regard exceptional students, athletes, scientists, artists, inventors, leaders, entrepreneurs, other geniuses as affronts to those who are not exceptional?  Should we slow down the hard workers and ambitious business owners to make things more “equal?”

Should we fault those who adapt to the world the way it is, instead of insisting that the past return for those who are stuck there?  Should we respond to the politicians who accuse government for making terrible agreements with other countries, or for not meeting all of our personal needs?  Is there something not great about America the way it is?

Make no mistake, America is the best place in the world for people who treasure liberty, personal freedom to live and work wherever we want, love who we want, go where we want, strive for our dreams, and as citizens vote how we want.

Go the Middle East, or Asia, or Africa, or Central America to see how the “other half” lives, and you will kiss the ground when you get back home to the United States of America.

 

 

Which Candidate is the Least of Evils? – Reality Shows No Mercy

Unfortunate.  That is my read on prospects for our country, no matter which of the TV characters we elect this year.  We are exhausted and wounded by the last eight years of economic and political warfare.  We have endured failed and flawed laws, and created too many burdened and impoverished families.  Pain is the current driving force in the nation.  Voters have flocked to messages of analgesia.

For this presidential campaign, we have been fed a weak gruel of promises that escape the powers of any president.  We have been led down a seductive, virtual path to accepting what we are shown on television as reality.  If this campaign were a distorted version of “House of Cards,” which of these characters has the strong suit?

Answer:  None of the above.

Exactly how did Donald Trump become a candidate?  Who accepted his credentials as a Republican?  I think the RNC let him in and wrote him off as a political rookie, a loser, and a joke.  His success is anathema to the political establishment, and the politically correct. His remaining opponents are a well-funded, somewhat-unpopular, Texas U.S. Senator, and, for a while, a media-faded, underfunded, state governor.

(By the way, I believe we lost some credible leaders in the pillow fight of Republican “debates.”  Marco Rubio, Carly Fiorina, Jeb Bush are examples of people with leadership and intellectual qualities who just lost on this rendition of “Survivor,” or maybe “The Apprentice” would be more appropriate.  Meanwhile, In the wings, waits Paul Ryan, the real Republican option against Hillary Clinton.)

The Democrats have a trust-dented candidate, and an uber-populist “straw man” who turned out to have more appeal to the disenfranchised than the DNC and the “super delegates” expected.  No one else passed the primary test.

However, I believe the Democrats chose their candidate immediately after her failed bid for president in 2008; before she was appointed Secretary of State; before Benghazi; and before a private email server and the FBI.

I do not know how they got Bernie Sanders to run in the first place.  But, hey, talk about nothing to lose, he was a third-term, Independent, Socialist, Senator from Vermont; he caucused with the Democrats until he joined the party in 2015.  He epitomizes what his opponent lacks:  compassion, empathy, honesty, consistency, and likability.

Really, DNC, just two viable candidates?  Farcical and lame.

It appears that the rise of disgusted, heretofore, non-voters is threatening what the powerful people in politics planned to be a “normal,” boring, “video game,” presidential race. An unexpected populist throng of dissatisfied, disillusioned, under-employed workers and their families rose up when they heard their thoughts, pains, suspicions, resentments, and complaints voiced by unburdened champions of the futures they had lost.  Others were refreshed by the smashing of political correctness, and the vision of America, free of foreign interference.

These are the marginalized people who have seldom voted before, because there seemed to be no voices that spoke for them.  The same thing happened simultaneously on the both ends of the political spectrum.  Together, these new and enthusiastic voters want to upset the power structure that keeps them down, i.e. party officials, “super delegates,” and cabals of money disguised as PACs.

The problems we face as a nation will not yield to any of the rhetoric on either side.

What can any president do to eclipse the lower costs of foreign competitors to our domestic businesses?  Close Walmart?

How would a president evict 12 million unregistered aliens with who knows how many 14th Amendment U.S. citizen children?  Tijuana taxis?

Since when has economic “inequality” been excised from the American Dream?  Show us any nation in the world that meets the definition of economic equality.  The whole concept of our nation is being free and able to exceed and succeed.  And who better to emblemize inequality than the current frontrunners for both parties.  Aren’t all the candidates at least in the top 10%?  Who would trust the White House to someone who was not?

Hillary Clinton impatiently awaits coronation, notwithstanding a dearth of significance.  At least she offers the advantage of having her husband as unofficial vice president.  Here, faithfully copied from HillaryClinton.com, are her 7 greatest accomplishments; you be the judge of their relevance and greatness:

 1.  Fought for children and families for 40 years and counting.

After law school, Hillary could have gone to work for a prestigious law firm, but took a job at the Children’s Defense Fund. She worked with teenagers incarcerated in adult prisons in South Carolina and families with disabled children in Massachusetts. It sparked a lifelong passion for helping children live up to their potential.

2.   Helped provide millions of children with health care.

As first lady of the United States, Hillary fought to help pass health care reform. When that effort failed, she didn’t give up: Hillary worked with Republicans and Democrats to help create the Children’s Health Insurance Program. CHIP cut the uninsured rate of American children by half, and today it provides health care to more than 8 million kids.

3.   Helped get 9/11 first responders the health care they needed.

When terrorists attacked just months after Hillary became U.S. senator from New York, she worked to make sure the 9/11 first responders who suffered lasting health effects from their time at Ground Zero got the care they needed.

4.  Told the world that “women’s rights are human rights.”

Standing in front of a U.N. conference and declaring that “women’s rights are human rights” was more controversial than it sounds today. Many within the U.S. government didn’t want Hillary to go to Beijing. Others wanted her to pick a less polarizing topic (you say polarizing; we say half the population). But Hillary was determined to speak out about human rights abuses, and her message became a rallying cry for a generation.

5.   Stood up for LGBT rights at home and abroad.

As secretary of state, Hillary made LGBT rights a focus of U.S. foreign policy. She lobbied for the first-ever U.N. Human Rights Council resolution on human rights and declared that “gay rights are human rights.” And here at home, she made the State Department a better, fairer place for LGBT employees to work.

6.   Helped expand health care and family leave for military families.

Hillary worked across the aisle to expand health care access for members of the National Guard and reservists—making sure those who served and their families had access to health care when they returned home. And she worked to expand the Family Medical Leave Act, allowing families of those wounded in service to their country to take leave in order to care for their loved ones.

7.   Negotiated a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas.

As our nation’s chief diplomat, Hillary didn’t back down when the stakes were high. As Hamas rockets rained down on Israel, Hillary went to the region immediately. Twenty-four hours after she landed, a ceasefire went into effect—and that year became Israel’s quietest in a decade.

 

 

What None of the Presidential Candidates Want to Address – Parity for Mental Health Care

Sure, Obamacare was supposed to raise the level of care for mental health to the level of physical health.  Sure, President Obama declared a $500 million increase in federal spending for mental health issues.  And……..?   That equals $1.56 per capita.  The states are decreasing their spending on mental health faster than that every year.

Those who venerate Ronald Reagan’s presidency may not have noticed that, once he converted federal health care into block grants to the states, the spending and resources for mental health collapsed to a feeble level.  As the mental health facilities closed, the new prisons opened, and the homeless population mushroomed.  Some experts estimate that 29% of the homeless have severe mental illness.  Department of Justice studies show that 45-65% of local, state, and federal prisoners have severe mental illness; about 1/3 receive treatment.  In other words, the justice system is in charge of mental health care in America.  A police officer is the most likely person to interact with the seriously disturbed citizen on our streets.  Then the most likely outcome would be to be incarcerated in a de facto asylum, or relegated to the streets.

I do not have the answers, but denial will not make things better.  Maybe it would better to convert our prisons into hospitals, and our prison guards into psychiatric nurses.  The last figure I heard was about $39,000 per inmate per year (about $107/day) for incarceration.  Then most of those released have not been treated for mental illnesses.  What do you think the chances are that they will have other episodes that might put them back in prison?

No one can guarantee that treatment would reduce recidivism; no statistics exist to test that theory.  All I know is that people I know do very well, when they take their meds.

So, here is the question every candidate for federal office: “It seems that all the candidates agree that mental illness has played a prominent role in the mass shootings around the US.  How well do you think the federal and state governments are managing mental healthcare in prisons, among the homeless, and the public?  What do you think they should do to really meet the needs?”